Quote
"Public transit is far from the only thing that makes for a shorter commute. As those economists found, it’s also a question of sprawl. City design and transit go hand in hand: it’s easier to design a public transit system that efficiently connects people in a more compact city than in a big one."

Suburban sprawl and bad transit can crush opportunity for the poor | Vox, 7/23/14 (via atlurbanist)

(via neosouthern)

Photo
takepart:

These teens are kicking fast food to the curb in the most awesome way!

To quote James Kunstler: “Tragic Clowns.”

takepart:

These teens are kicking fast food to the curb in the most awesome way!

To quote James Kunstler: “Tragic Clowns.”

Quote
"You look around and there is an oil spill just about everyday, but we can’t put up a wind turbine because it might kill a bird or it might be ugly."

— Robert Kulick, president of CRESIT Energy, on the challenges of creating a wind power revolution in Detroit.  (via ladyjoestar)

We need artisanal wind turbines! Make them look cool! Then a wind turbine is a value add on the aesthetic side! We might also re-imagine some shared uses of the wind farms: bicycle tracks, pool/spa resorts, etc.

(via archstar)

Photo
atlurbanist:

"4 Requirements for a Bikeable Community"  — cool graphic on from good.

Four part bicycle plan. That’s right: 4 parts! (Not just safety.)

atlurbanist:

"4 Requirements for a Bikeable Community"  — cool graphic on from good.

Four part bicycle plan. That’s right: 4 parts! (Not just safety.)

(via planforthefuture)

Video

takepart:

This coffee shop may be the ultimate getaway

Photo
homebru:

cadenced:

From Project for Public Spaces.


Word.
Photo
thisiscitylab:


If real estate developers don’t want to miss out on the next big thing, they should focus on “walkable urban places,” or “WalkUPs,” according to a new report from LOCUS, a coalition of real estate investors that’s part of Smart Growth America. LOCUS found that rents for commercial spaces in walkable districts inside otherwise car-dependent suburbs command a 74 percent premium over non-walkable areas. The researchers argue that this is symptomatic of an ongoing societal shift.
“The last time we saw a structural change like this was back in the ’40s and ’50s,” said Christopher Leinberger, one of the authors of the report. “It’s going to take 20 to 30 years to catch up with pent-up demand.”

-Making the Real Estate Case for ‘Walkable Urban Places’
[Image: Flickr/BeyondDC]


In any context, walkable neighborhoods make sense! Health, housing, construction, energy efficiency, city resources, etc Here’s the case for… retail realty.

thisiscitylab:

If real estate developers don’t want to miss out on the next big thing, they should focus on “walkable urban places,” or “WalkUPs,” according to a new report from LOCUS, a coalition of real estate investors that’s part of Smart Growth America. LOCUS found that rents for commercial spaces in walkable districts inside otherwise car-dependent suburbs command a 74 percent premium over non-walkable areas. The researchers argue that this is symptomatic of an ongoing societal shift.

“The last time we saw a structural change like this was back in the ’40s and ’50s,” said Christopher Leinberger, one of the authors of the report. “It’s going to take 20 to 30 years to catch up with pent-up demand.”

-Making the Real Estate Case for ‘Walkable Urban Places’

[Image: Flickr/BeyondDC]

In any context, walkable neighborhoods make sense! Health, housing, construction, energy efficiency, city resources, etc Here’s the case for… retail realty.

(via homebru)

Photoset

These 3-D Printed Houses From China Appear In Just A Few Hours

They won’t win any beauty contest, but a Chinese company has figured out how to print practical homes from waste materials—all for half the cost of conventional construction.

Read More>

via fastcompany:

(via homebru)

Quote
"Most cities in the world were bicycle friendly in the beginning."

Bicycle SA

Indeed, almost every city has an exception bicycle network. It’s just full of cars. 

So how to get back to the beginning? We investigate.

(via thisbigcity)

True! I am reading a book about Seattle. And such is the case there!

(via homebru)

Link

homebru:

Very interesting article from The Guardian examining how emerging trends in development, socioeconomics, as well as a growing aversion to the consumerist culture in America.

(Source: urban-ecology)